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#86529
I'm having trouble ID'ing some of the cormorants found around English Bay & 2nd Beach.

Leaning towards Brandt's on this one because of the faint tan patches, but in all the Brandt's photos I see it is much more prominent:

[EDIT] now thinking it's Juvenile Pelagic... tail looks quite long.

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Is it possible for a Pelagic to have those faint little chin spots?

This second one is a poor shot, but I am guessing Pelagic due to the head/bill shape. Maybe the photo isn't good enough for a 100% ID.

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Thoughts?
#86642
I'm no ornithologist, but I've spent a fair amount of time spying on the nest colonies under our bridges - both pelagics & double-cresteds on the 2nd narrows, pelagics only under the Burrard (normally) and Granville. I think you are correct in your ID. The light gular patch lasts awhile after they are fledged and flying.

It is not often one sees a cormorant rise with a fish not yet in the throat sleeve. That youngster may be just discovering the problem with starry flounders. I always find it kind of amusing to watch the struggle to get those down - I've seen an adult glaucous-winged gull, and a couple years ago a great blue heron, wrestle with the problem for many minutes. My gull ultimately succeeded, my heron did not, after having put in much more time trying.

Love the photos.

Cheers
#86660
whanem wrote:I'm no ornithologist, but I've spent a fair amount of time spying on the nest colonies under our bridges - both pelagics & double-cresteds on the 2nd narrows, pelagics only under the Burrard (normally) and Granville. I think you are correct in your ID. The light gular patch lasts awhile after they are fledged and flying.

It is not often one sees a cormorant rise with a fish not yet in the throat sleeve. That youngster may be just discovering the problem with starry flounders. I always find it kind of amusing to watch the struggle to get those down - I've seen an adult glaucous-winged gull, and a couple years ago a great blue heron, wrestle with the problem for many minutes. My gull ultimately succeeded, my heron did not, after having put in much more time trying.

Love the photos.

Cheers

Thank you for the response... I will assume Pelagic then.

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